Canadian Coin Grading


These pages describe the criteria used to assign grades to Canadian circulation coins. It also shows sample images of each grade.

Most photos used here were taken of coins that have been professionally graded by companies such as PCGS, NGC, ICCS, CCCS, ANACS, or ICG.

(See the bottom of this page for a few comments about this guide)

Click on any photo below to load the grading page for that series of coins:

Monarch
1 Cent
5 Cent
10 Cent
20 Cent
25 Cent
50 Cent
1 Dollar
Victoria
1858 1c

1859-1901
1858-1901
1858-1901
1858 Only
1870-1901
1870-1901
 
Edward VII
1902-1910
1902-1910
1902-1910
 
1902-1910
1902-1910
 
George V
1911-1920 Large

1920-1936 Small
1911-1921

1922-1936
1911-1936
 
1911-1936
1911-1936
1935

1936
George VI
1937-1952
1937-1952
1937-1952
 
1937-1952
1937-1952
1937-1952
Elizabeth II
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)
 
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)
1953-1964
(Coming Soon)

1965-1978
(Coming Soon)

NOTES:

1. I would like to apologize in advance for the missing and less than ideal photos you will encounter.
As you can imagine it is not a simple task to find very high quality photos of professionally graded Canadian coins
minted since 1858; in every grade, every monarch and every denomination.
In order to cover every combination from Poor-1 to MS-67, photos of 1053 coins have to be located, resized, edited and saved.
That represents a total of 4212 images (For each coin: the obverse photo, the reverse photo, the two combined images to use in the guide, and a photo of the slab to provide provenance if possible).

The reasons for so many holes?
  - Most people don't bother to send a 1939 5-cent coin in Good-4 condition to be professionally graded and
    slabbed (the cost of grading far outweighs the value of the coin).
  - The more modern a coin is, the less likely it will exist in a very low grade.
  - There isn't one magical web site that contains every photo necessary. If these photos exist, they are
   scattered all over the internet (which is a pretty big place). But by the time these pages are complete,
   this WILL be that one magical web site that contains every photo necessary!

In some cases I have included photos of coins that have NOT been professionally graded, but I have endevoured to find photos of raw coins which match the text description of the grade as closely as possible. These images have been reviewed and approved by two of the club's grading experts. Where possible these images are being used as a place holder only. I eventually plan to replace them with photos of professionally graded coins.

I am constantly searching to fill the empty spaces and find better quality photos. This has become both a labour of love and a test to see how stubborn I can actually be.

3. We would like to thank PCGS (the Professional Coin Grading Service), Heritage Auctions and all of the other contributors for allowing us to use their spectacular images.

4. While the vast majority of photos in this guide are of coins that have been professionally graded, mistakes can always happen. Even with the stringent industry guidelines in place, grading coins is a subjective process.
- Some grading companies may use slightly different critera,
- At the core of it all coins are graded by human beings, and the mood of the grader can sometimes affect the assigned grade of a coin. Everybody has a bad day once in a while (or a really good day)...
- Each photo in this guide has been reviewed by a panel of the coin club's grading experts. Wherever necessary the displayed grades have been changed by our experts to accurately reflect the grading standard that we agree is accurate.

And with all of that said, we hope you enjoy making use of this guide.

Return to Articles list
Return to Coin Club Home Page